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JOSÉ ROMANILLOS 03 | SOUND of OLD guitars when they were NEW

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JOSÉ ROMANILLOS 03 | SOUND of OLD guitars when they were NEW


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CustomGuitarVideo.com | It is a valid question: how do we validate the sound of a 150 year old guitar? What did the people hear when this guitar was new or just perfectly broken in? How much do guitars change over the the course of a century? José Romanillos tries to give an answer. José Romanillos became famous by building the guitars for Classical Guitar Virtuoso Julian Bream. He his one of the last icons in Spanish guitar making tradition. His guitars are among the most sought after classical guitars. José wrote numerous books about the Spanish guitar and the man who defined the classical guitar as we know it today, Antonio de Torres. We spent a whole week in Següenza, Spain close to Madrid to document his last guitar. In the first part José talks about how to select wood and the validity of old methods. This is right from the workbench. Spanish "Guitar Making" at its best.

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TheMcGivvern : Strangely enough he makes enough mistakes to prove this is fake. His accent is ok, but he makes so may mistakes that show he is an American actor it gets silly
TexasSizzle : I personally think that the biggest difference between hearing old and New-old (restored or gently "cleaned") guitars is likely the strings. Silk or gut decidedly sound better, more romantic, and softer. New nylon tech strings sound markedly louder and somewhat less pure but more overtones. While for instance Torres guitar played and heard in 1863 or so was a fairly new instrument, sometimes obviously brand new,
DrHelmeBrawn : Pero que puto crack que habla ingles y todo...eso es un tio preparao..un maestro
TexasSizzle : so it is ridiculous to assume that that same instrument might not grow a much more mature sound due simply to 150 or some odd years even without being played much. Any guitar can be broken in reasonably well in 3 years with much playing and sometimes a bit less in my opinion. Of course there are many factors at play besides strings. Even the same guitar can be very finicky and not sound good at all one night, and yet play and sound marvelous another, much like a woman, ahem or any man as well.
anything7441 : Im going to be making a guitar soon, i found so many great ideas and facts i saw this guys shop, and since I've been an artist since birth i quickly knew we had something in common. I cant understand a fucking word he says and we both had cool long hair when we were younger. Seems like a great friend. may my guitar be better to me than yours is to you.
vgfigue : Great talk! I especially enjoy your explanation on the controllable variable of the guitar. It is precisely the fact that we're dealing with an inhomogeneous material--each piece of wood with its own growth history--that makes it impossible to control all the variables that determine the sound of the guitar. Only those variables that are independent of the history of the wood seem to be worth controlling.
Giancarlo Dieci :

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